Blog

 RSS Feed

Category: Literature

  1. The Iconic Neon Sign for Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap

    Posted on

    The Mousetrap

    Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap is the world's longest running play. The iconic neon sign at the front of St Martin's Theatre welcomes theatregoers and announces the longevity of the play. The play originally opened in London's West End on 25th November 1952. Each year as the production celebrates its anniversary the sign is changed. I decided to along  this year and here are a few photos I took.

  2. The Magic of Staying in an Oxford College

    Posted on

     Christ Church Hall

    Oxford, with its world famous university, is only about 50 miles/ 80km from London and is easily doable as a day trip. During the vacation period many colleges rent out their rooms to the public, it's a great opportunity to stay somewhere very unique and historic, so I booked a two night stay at Christ Church, Oxford's largest college. To be honest I wasn't sure what to expect but it exceeded my expectations and I loved every minute of my stay there. 

  3. The Wonderpass - Discovering Baker Street's Colourful History

    Posted on

    The Wonderpass - Baker Street Quarter 

    The Wonderpass is now open. The Marylebone subway, next to Baker Street Tube Station, has been transformed to showcase the area's colourful history and its cultural attractions. In 2014 Baker Street Quarter Partnership, who commissioned the project, approached me to research the timeline for the Wonderpass. When it opened in January 2016, I was very proud to visit and see the results of my research on display.

  4. Following in the Footsteps of Vincent Price on the Witchfinder General Tour

    Posted on

    Witchfinder General Tour Lavenham Guildhall

    Lavenham Guildhall

    Lavenham, in Suffolk, is one of Britain's finest medieval villages. With its magnificent timber framed Guildhall and pretty cottages it is the quintessential, picture postcard town. However in 1968, its picturesque Market Place became the film location of one of the most horrific scenes in Vincent Price's Witchfinder General. Last month I was thrilled to attend the Witchfinder General Location Tour with the Vincent Price London Legacy Tour 2015 and Victoria Price, Vincent's daughter.

  5. A Visit to the Macabre - Edgar Allan Poe's House Philadelphia

    Posted on

    Edgar Allan Poes House Philadelphia

    Edgar Allan Poe (1809 – 1849) was an author of gothic, macabre tales and poems. Some of his best known works are "The Raven", which is commemorated with a statute in the garden of his former home, and "The Fall of the House of Usher". His short story,  "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", is considered to be the first modern detective story. So when I recently attended the Death Salon in Philadelphia I was thrilled to visit his former home.

  6. Trocadero's Enchanting Arthurian Frieze in Picturehouse Central

    Posted on

    Trocadero frieze

    On a recent visit to the newly opened Picturehouse Central in the Trocadero Centre, I was delighted to discover this captivating Arthurian themed frieze. After the film I took a few photos, which wasn’t easy, as I was on a moving escalator, but I managed to capture all ten panels.

  7. Midsummer Night's Dreaming at the Museum of the Order of St John

    Posted on

    Museum of the Order of St John Chapter Hall

    Chapter Hall

    Last week I was thrilled to attend  "A Midsummer Day's Dream" Champagne Tea at the Museum of the Order of St John. The museum occupies two historic sites, the  gatehouse which houses the museum's galleries and has a series of stunning rooms and a seperate building which includes the Priory Church and the Norman crypt. The magnificent suite of historic rooms provided the perfect backdrop for a splendid afternoon of Shakespearean entertainment of drama, music and dance and the balmy hot summer weather just addded to the surreal and magical atmosphere.

  8. Croydon Airport - London's First International Airport

    Posted on

     Croydon Airport

    Before the days of package holidays and low cost airlines, back in the early 1900s the thrill of air travel was only available to the wealthy. In 1920 Croydon Airport became London's first international airport when customs and passanger handling facilities were introduced. Today the main terminal building, with its control tower, has been converted into offices and is home to a fascinating visitor centre which is open to the public on the first Sunday of every month.

  9. Where Agatha Miller became Agatha Christie

    Posted on

     Emmanuel Court Bristol

    On Christmas Eve, 24th December 1914 Agatha Miller married Archie Christie, her first husband, at Emmanuel Church, Guthrie Road, Clifton, Bristol. On a recent visit to the city I did a bit of research to identify the location of the church only to discover, like in all good detective novels, that things were not as they first appeared to be.

  10. Andaz Hotel - Afternoon Tea, Bedlam, Dracula and a Secret Masonic Temple

    Posted on

    Andaz Hotel

    The Andaz Hotel has been on my must do list for ages (for fascinating reasons listed in the blog title) and a couple of weeks ago I had the pleasure of going there with the delightful Helen Langley. The hotel's 1901 Restaurant, where afternoon tea is served, certainly has the wow factor and it was orginally built as the hotel's ballroom.