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Category: Literature

  1. The Iconic Neon Sign for Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap

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    The Mousetrap

    Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap is the world's longest running play. The iconic neon sign at the front of St Martin's Theatre welcomes theatregoers and announces the longevity of the play. The play originally opened in London's West End on 25th November 1952. Each year as the production celebrates its anniversary the sign is changed. I decided to along  this year and here are a few photos I took.

  2. The Wonderpass - Discovering Baker Street's Colourful History

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    The Wonderpass - Baker Street Quarter 

    The Wonderpass is now open. The Marylebone subway, next to Baker Street Tube Station, has been transformed to showcase the area's colourful history and its cultural attractions. In 2014 Baker Street Quarter Partnership, who commissioned the project, approached me to research the timeline for the Wonderpass. When it opened in January 2016, I was very proud to visit and see the results of my research on display.

  3. Trocadero's Enchanting Arthurian Frieze in Picturehouse Central

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    Trocadero frieze

    On a recent visit to the newly opened Picturehouse Central in the Trocadero Centre, I was delighted to discover this captivating Arthurian themed frieze. After the film I took a few photos, which wasn’t easy, as I was on a moving escalator, but I managed to capture all ten panels.

  4. Midsummer Night's Dreaming at the Museum of the Order of St John

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    Museum of the Order of St John Chapter Hall

    Chapter Hall

    Last week I was thrilled to attend  "A Midsummer Day's Dream" Champagne Tea at the Museum of the Order of St John. The museum occupies two historic sites, the  gatehouse which houses the museum's galleries and has a series of stunning rooms and a seperate building which includes the Priory Church and the Norman crypt. The magnificent suite of historic rooms provided the perfect backdrop for a splendid afternoon of Shakespearean entertainment of drama, music and dance and the balmy hot summer weather just addded to the surreal and magical atmosphere.

  5. Croydon Airport - London's First International Airport

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     Croydon Airport

    Before the days of package holidays and low cost airlines, back in the early 1900s the thrill of air travel was only available to the wealthy. In 1920 Croydon Airport became London's first international airport when customs and passanger handling facilities were introduced. Today the main terminal building, with its control tower, has been converted into offices and is home to a fascinating visitor centre which is open to the public on the first Sunday of every month.

  6. Where Agatha Miller became Agatha Christie

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     Emmanuel Court Bristol

    On Christmas Eve, 24th December 1914 Agatha Miller married Archie Christie, her first husband, at Emmanuel Church, Guthrie Road, Clifton, Bristol. On a recent visit to the city I did a bit of research to identify the location of the church only to discover, like in all good detective novels, that things were not as they first appeared to be.

  7. The Mysterious Affair at Harrogate - Agatha Christie's Disappearance

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    Old Swan Hotel Harrogate

    Old Swan Hotel - Harrogate

    Earlier this month I fulfilled my long standing wish to stay at the Old Swan Hotel in Harrogate which has  connections with the  mysterious disappearance of Agatha Christie, the Queen of Crime.

    On the evening of 3rd December 1926 Agatha left her home in Sunningdale and her 4 seater Morris Cowley car was later found abandoned at Newlands Corner in Surrey. By this time Agatha was aged 36 years old and was already a successful crime writer and her 6th novel, The Murder of Roger Ackroyd had just been published. Her sudden disappearance attracted both national and worldwide interest. The search for Agatha was the largest manhunt of the time, involving over 1,000 police officers and civilians, and reputedly the first search in England to use airplanes. Arthur Conan Doyle (author of Sherlock Holmes) gave a medium one of her gloves in the hope of locating her, however Agatha's whereabouts remained a mystery for several days. 

  8. Mrs Mallowan's Wallingford aka Agatha Christie

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    Agatha Christie - Winterbrook House

    Mrs Mallowan, aka Agatha Christie, lived in Wallingford, Oxfordshire for many years and is buried in nearby Cholsey. In my quest to visit the key locations associated with the world's best selling author of all time, I made a visit to the town to discover its Christie connections.

  9. Sherlock and Speedy's Cafe

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    Speedys Cafe

    Speedy’s Sandwich Bar and Cafe, with its instantly recognisable red canopy, features in all three television series of the BBC’s Sherlock. It's located directly below the first floor flat which is home to Sherlock and Watson. Since featuring in the hit TV series, with its modern day twist on Sherlock Holmes, the cafe has been welcoming fans who visit. So the other day I stopped by for a delicious breakfast.

  10. Crime and Cream Teas at the Agatha Christie Festival Part 2

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     agatha christie festival -christie mile grand hotel torquay

    Agatha Christie Mile Plaque - Torquay

    Crime and Cream Teas Part II features more about my recent trip to the Agatha Christie Festival in her home town of Torquay. In Part I I wrote about my visit to Greenway, Agatha's holiday home but in this blog I am focusing on some of the other things I did.