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Category: Cemeteries, Public Executions & Death

  1. Swardeston - Visiting Edith Cavell's Birthplace

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    Edith Cavell War memorial Swardeston

    The war memorial in Swardeston, Norfolk, is rather special. A simple, granite stone Celtic cross has the name Edith Cavell at the top of the list of villagers who lost their lives in World War I (1914 - 1919). Nurse Edith Cavell was executed on 12th October 1915, by a German firing squad during World War I, for her role in assisting over 200 soldiers to escape from occupied Belgium. I visited Swardeston, the village where Edith was born and spent her childhood and taken on a walking tour by Nick Miller, Edith Cavell expert and author, to see the locations that were significent to Edith.

  2. Edith Cavell Wreath Laying Ceremony by St Martin in the Fields

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    Edith Cavell Wreath Laying Ceremony

    Nurse Edith Cavell was executed on 12th October 1915, during World War I, for assisting over 200 allied soldiers escape occupied Belgium. There is an annual public wreath laying ceremony that takes place at her memorial, in London, on the anniversary of her death, which is organised by the Cavell Nurses' Trust. The next wreath laying service will be held on Wednesday 12th October 2016 at 10.30am and is free to attend.

  3. Coffin Works - Birmingham's Industrial Heritage Brought Back to Life

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     Coffin Works

    As a volunteer at Barts Pathology Museum and a lover of all things macabre, quirky and unusual when I heard about the Coffin Works, a former coffin fittings factory in Birmingham, I just had to visit. I booked myself on a guided tour and just loved it. It's utterly fascinating, certainly not morbid or gruesome and it's suitable for children. It's an industial heritage museum, simular to Ironbridge or Beamish, but just on a much smaller and more intimate scale as it is a single building and it focuses on the death industry. 

  4. York - Some of My Favourite Things to Do

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    York Minster

    York in North Yorkshire, England, has a fascinating history, beautiful architecture, a fabulous selection of places to eat and drink and there's plenty to see and do.  It's one of my most loved cities and here is a brief list of some of my  favourite things to do in York.

  5. The Distribution of Hot Cross Buns in a Churchyard

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    Butterworth Charity

    On Good Friday hot cross buns are distributed in the churchyard of St Bartholomew the Great. The ceremony known as the Butterworth Charity, was named after Joshua Whitehead Butterworth who created the trust in 1887. It was set up to provide the sum of six pence to twenty one needy widows in the parish and buns were to be handed out to children who attended the distribution. With the understanding that nowadays anyone who attends can have a hot cross bun I went to investigate further.  

  6. Mrs Mallowan's Wallingford aka Agatha Christie

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    Agatha Christie - Winterbrook House

    Mrs Mallowan, aka Agatha Christie, lived in Wallingford, Oxfordshire for many years and is buried in nearby Cholsey. In my quest to visit the key locations associated with the world's best selling author of all time, I made a visit to the town to discover its Christie connections.

  7. Spitalfields Charnel House – Suitable for the Squeamish

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    Spitalfields Charnel House

    Lying beneath a glass pavement close to Spitalfields Market is a charnel house, an amazing reminder of the area’s medieval past. It’s located in a sunken courtyard accessed by steps and is only occasionally open to the public.

  8. Sacred Tarts at Barts Pathology Museum

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    Sacred Tarts

     Our Lady Of Sorrows by Cake Follies

    Sacred Tarts - a divine cake sale

    When you attends an event at Barts Pathology Museum you can always expect a fun and entertaining time. On Easter Saturday 2013, Sacred Tarts saw the museum hosting a religious themed cake sale which provided an array of tempting goodies as an alternative to the traditional Easter egg. On offer were edible crucifixes, pope cakes and St Lucy's Eyeball Truffles just to name a few. In addition there were cocktails, live music and the opportunity to view the museum's collection. The cakes are a work of art in themselves and almost too nice to eat.

  9. A Visit to St Pancras Old Church Gardens

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    St Pancras Old Church

    Last week I took a little detour to visit the delightful St Pancras Old Church which is quietly tucked away behind St Pancras International Station. Although adjacent to the busy main railway line it's a peaceful, little oasis.

    It’s believed to be one of the oldest sites of Christian worship in England, dating back to 314 AD, although the church one sees today was restored in the Victorian period.  It became known as Old when the new church was built in nearby Euston Road. The church and neighbouring railway station are both named after a child martyr beheaded in Rome for his Christian faith.