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Category: People

  1. The Iconic Neon Sign for Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap

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    The Mousetrap

    Agatha Christie's The Mousetrap is the world's longest running play. The iconic neon sign at the front of St Martin's Theatre welcomes theatregoers and announces the longevity of the play. The play originally opened in London's West End on 25th November 1952. Each year as the production celebrates its anniversary the sign is changed. I decided to along  this year and here are a few photos I took.

  2. Swardeston - Visiting Edith Cavell's Birthplace

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    Edith Cavell War memorial Swardeston

    The war memorial in Swardeston, Norfolk, is rather special. A simple, granite stone Celtic cross has the name Edith Cavell at the top of the list of villagers who lost their lives in World War I (1914 - 1919). Nurse Edith Cavell was executed on 12th October 1915, by a German firing squad during World War I, for her role in assisting over 200 soldiers to escape from occupied Belgium. I visited Swardeston, the village where Edith was born and spent her childhood and taken on a walking tour by Nick Miller, Edith Cavell expert and author, to see the locations that were significent to Edith.

  3. Following in the Footsteps of Vincent Price on the Witchfinder General Tour

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    Witchfinder General Tour Lavenham Guildhall

    Lavenham Guildhall

    Lavenham, in Suffolk, is one of Britain's finest medieval villages. With its magnificent timber framed Guildhall and pretty cottages it is the quintessential, picture postcard town. However in 1968, its picturesque Market Place became the film location of one of the most horrific scenes in Vincent Price's Witchfinder General. Last month I was thrilled to attend the Witchfinder General Location Tour with the Vincent Price London Legacy Tour 2015 and Victoria Price, Vincent's daughter.

  4. A Visit to the Macabre - Edgar Allan Poe's House Philadelphia

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    Edgar Allan Poes House Philadelphia

    Edgar Allan Poe (1809 – 1849) was an author of gothic, macabre tales and poems. Some of his best known works are "The Raven", which is commemorated with a statute in the garden of his former home, and "The Fall of the House of Usher". His short story,  "The Murders in the Rue Morgue", is considered to be the first modern detective story. So when I recently attended the Death Salon in Philadelphia I was thrilled to visit his former home.

  5. Edith Cavell Wreath Laying Ceremony by St Martin in the Fields

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    Edith Cavell Wreath Laying Ceremony

    Nurse Edith Cavell was executed on 12th October 1915, during World War I, for assisting over 200 allied soldiers escape occupied Belgium. There is an annual public wreath laying ceremony that takes place at her memorial, in London, on the anniversary of her death, which is organised by the Cavell Nurses' Trust. The next wreath laying service will be held on Wednesday 12th October 2016 at 10.30am and is free to attend.

  6. "This is a Spot Most Beautiful" Eltham Palace's Art Deco Elegance

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    Eltham Palace - Entrance Hall

    Entrance Hall

    Eltham Palace is best known today for its sumptuous art deco interiors created in the 1930s - 1940s when Stephen and Virginia Courthauld resided there. The house however has an amazing history, from medieval manor house and Tudor royal palace to the Courtaulds, which is covered my original blog post.

    Last month I made a long overdue return visit to as this year they have opened five more rooms and this blog is going to focus on its art deco interiors, although at the time this style would have been referred to Moderne, as the term art deco wasn't coined until 1960s. If you think the Entrance Hall looks amazing wait till you see the bathroom. Warning there are rather a lot of photos. 

  7. Catherine, the Duchess of Cambridge, and the Wallpaper at The Goring

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    The Goring

    The Goring is the hotel where in 2011, Catherine Middleton and her family stayed the night before her marriage to Prince William. The other week I visited for afternoon tea with @DawnCorleone which is featured seperately in my Scones of the Month blog. When I entered their Front Hall, I was immediately impressed with their beautiful wallpaper, so much so that when we left the restaurant we went to have a closer look. The Goring's Facebook page states that "The Goring's Front Hall is a destination in itself". DawnC was staying there, as a guest, so was able to tell me more about it, thanks Dawn, and I loved it so much I felt I just had to blog about it.

  8. Where Agatha Miller became Agatha Christie

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     Emmanuel Court Bristol

    On Christmas Eve, 24th December 1914 Agatha Miller married Archie Christie, her first husband, at Emmanuel Church, Guthrie Road, Clifton, Bristol. On a recent visit to the city I did a bit of research to identify the location of the church only to discover, like in all good detective novels, that things were not as they first appeared to be.

  9. Andaz Hotel - Afternoon Tea, Bedlam, Dracula and a Secret Masonic Temple

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    Andaz Hotel

    The Andaz Hotel has been on my must do list for ages (for fascinating reasons listed in the blog title) and a couple of weeks ago I had the pleasure of going there with the delightful Helen Langley. The hotel's 1901 Restaurant, where afternoon tea is served, certainly has the wow factor and it was orginally built as the hotel's ballroom.

  10. Two Temple Place - William Waldorf Astor's Riverside Mansion

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    Two Temple Place

    Two Temple Place was built for William Waldorf Astor, one of the richest men in the world, and today it is owned by the Bulldog Trust charity. Since 2012 it has opened its doors for a free annual exhibition. With this also comes the wonderful opportunity to visit one of the most splendid buildings in London, a magnificent Victorian house.