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Category: Medicine & Science

  1. Swardeston - Visiting Edith Cavell's Birthplace

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    Edith Cavell War memorial Swardeston

    The war memorial in Swardeston, Norfolk, is rather special. A simple, granite stone Celtic cross has the name Edith Cavell at the top of the list of villagers who lost their lives in World War I (1914 - 1919). Nurse Edith Cavell was executed on 12th October 1915, by a German firing squad during World War I, for her role in assisting over 200 soldiers to escape from occupied Belgium. I visited Swardeston, the village where Edith was born and spent her childhood and taken on a walking tour by Nick Miller, Edith Cavell expert and author, to see the locations that were significent to Edith.

  2. Midsummer Night's Dreaming at the Museum of the Order of St John

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    Museum of the Order of St John Chapter Hall

    Chapter Hall

    Last week I was thrilled to attend  "A Midsummer Day's Dream" Champagne Tea at the Museum of the Order of St John. The museum occupies two historic sites, the  gatehouse which houses the museum's galleries and has a series of stunning rooms and a seperate building which includes the Priory Church and the Norman crypt. The magnificent suite of historic rooms provided the perfect backdrop for a splendid afternoon of Shakespearean entertainment of drama, music and dance and the balmy hot summer weather just addded to the surreal and magical atmosphere.

  3. Meet Raving and Melancholy Madness

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    Bethlem Museum of the Mind

    Melancholy (right) and Raving (left)

    On arrival at the recently re-opened Bethlem Museum of the Mind I was met by Raving and Melancholy Madness. These two iconic, 7 foot tall, reclining figures depict two different forms of mental ill health. They were made by Caius Gabriel Cibber, who also made the bas relief at the base of The Monument, and the sculptures were originally on display at the hospital’s entrance in Moorgate, from 1676 to 1815. When the hospital moved, into the building which is now the Imperial War Museum London, the statutes were moved to the entrance hall but kept behind curtains. Today once again they welcome visitors to Bethlem Royal Hospital as they grace either side of the beautiful, art deco staircase. 

  4. Croydon Airport - London's First International Airport

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     Croydon Airport

    Before the days of package holidays and low cost airlines, back in the early 1900s the thrill of air travel was only available to the wealthy. In 1920 Croydon Airport became London's first international airport when customs and passanger handling facilities were introduced. Today the main terminal building, with its control tower, has been converted into offices and is home to a fascinating visitor centre which is open to the public on the first Sunday of every month.

  5. Crime and Cream Teas at the Agatha Christie Festival Part 2

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     agatha christie festival -christie mile grand hotel torquay

    Agatha Christie Mile Plaque - Torquay

    Crime and Cream Teas Part II features more about my recent trip to the Agatha Christie Festival in her home town of Torquay. In Part I I wrote about my visit to Greenway, Agatha's holiday home but in this blog I am focusing on some of the other things I did.

  6. Royal London Hospital Museum - Explore Whitechapel's Amazing Medical History

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    Royal London Hospital Museum

     Some of the display cabinets in this well laid out medical history museum – All photos courtesy of The Royal London Hospital Archives

    The Royal London Hospital Museum is a wonderful small, medical museum located in the crypt of a beautiful former church, St Augustine with St Philip's, in the hospital grounds. Whitechapel is an area best known for its associations with the infamous Jack the Ripper and this is just one of the displays at the museum.

    However, there is so much more to offer and for me, my visit there was to find out more about Nurse Edith Cavell and the hospital’s most famous patient/ inmate Joseph Merrick, who is also known as The Elephant Man, while I was researching a new walk for Centre of The Cell.

  7. Centre of the Cell - What's Inside this Colourful Building

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     Centre of the Cell

    The entrance to Centre of the Cell is located in the smaller of two blocks

    Tucked away only a couple of minutes from the busy Whitechapel Road is Centre of the Cell, a medical and science based educational centre which uses the latest interactive technology to create a fun learning environment.

    Centre of the Cell is located in the Blizard Insistute, named after Sir William Blizard, a distinguished surgeon at The London Hospital and one of the College's founders.

    It’s one of the most colourful and slightly outrageous buildings in East London.

  8. Sacred Tarts at Barts Pathology Museum

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    Sacred Tarts

     Our Lady Of Sorrows by Cake Follies

    Sacred Tarts - a divine cake sale

    When you attends an event at Barts Pathology Museum you can always expect a fun and entertaining time. On Easter Saturday 2013, Sacred Tarts saw the museum hosting a religious themed cake sale which provided an array of tempting goodies as an alternative to the traditional Easter egg. On offer were edible crucifixes, pope cakes and St Lucy's Eyeball Truffles just to name a few. In addition there were cocktails, live music and the opportunity to view the museum's collection. The cakes are a work of art in themselves and almost too nice to eat.